Boston Marathon race updates by Boston.com

Boston Marathon race updates by Boston.com

Stride-by-stride coverage of the elite field of male and female runners as well as the wheelchair racers, from Hopkinton to the finish line on Boylston Street.

  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:24:09 PM
    The BAA says the temperature at the starting line in Hopkinton has risen 15 degrees in the last hour. It's now 65.5 degrees, and getting warmer.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:25:36 PM
    The wheelchair leaders have passed the 3 mile mark in Ashland.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:27:23 PM
    The BAA has corrected the temperature at the start. They now say it's 54.5 degrees, so the rise in the last hour is 5 degrees, not 15.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:28:28 PM
    Boston, with its steep uphills and downhills, is not considered a particularly fast marathon course. In Runner's World magazine, Ron McCracken called it "uniquely brutal." Only 18 of the 400 best marathons of all time have been run here, and eight of those occurred in the epic 2011 race, where perfect temperatures, a persistent tailwind, and an especially talented field combined to produced not only the fastest marathon of all time, the 2:03:03 by winner Geoffrey Mutai, but the second fastest ever, the 2:03:06 by Moses Mosop. Both men are Kenyans.

    The American record of 2:04:58, by Ryan Hall, was also set in that race, and is the 38th fastest marathon ever.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:29:34 PM
    The elite women are at the starting line in Hopkinton, jogging back and forth along a stretch of East Main Street (Route 135) to warm up.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:31:19 PM
    We are still waiting for an update on the wheelchair racers, now approaching Framingham. We likely won't get one until after the elite women start in a few minutes.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:32:05 PM
    THEY’RE OFF! The field of 21 elite women who just left the starting line in Hopkinton is the fastest in Boston Marathon history, with 10 runners recording times of 2:23:00 or faster.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:33:45 PM
    Shalane Flanagan of Oregon, a Marblehead native, has pulled out to an early lead in the women's race.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:35:40 PM
    Wakako Tsuchida of Japan is in first place in the women's wheelchair race at the 5K mark with a time of 9:15.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:37:35 PM
    Shalane Flanagan still leads the women's runners, followed closely by Mare Dibaba of Ethiopia.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:38:37 PM
    Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa has the early lead in the men's wheelchair race. Through the 5K mark in Ashland he had a 15 second lead on Masazumi Soejima and Kota Hokinoue. His split was 7:45. Van Dyk is a nine-time Boston winner.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:38:38 PM
    Wakako Tsuchida of Japan finished the first five miles of the race in 15:42.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:39:23 PM
    Defending women’s wheelchair champ Tatyana McFadden did something last year that no other athlete, able-bodied or disabled, had ever done: She won four major marathons - Boston, London, Chicago, and New York - in a calendar year.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:41:02 PM
    You can usually count on a few interesting costumes in the marathon field: Supermen, Batmen, sandwich boards, beer-can hats, keg-rollers, and the like. Not this year, thanks to the heightened security. The BAA sent every runner a reminder that banned are costumes "covering the face or any non-form-fitting, bulky outfits extending beyond the perimeter of the body." Incidentally, the same rules apply to spectators.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:41:09 PM
    Shalane Flanagan ran the first mile in 5:11 - a marathon pace of 2:15:54. That will not be the finish time.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:42:16 PM
    In addition to Desiree Davila Linden, Marblehead native Shalane Flanagan is the USA’s best hope of a Boston win by an American woman - the first since 1985. Flanagan, who lives in Oregon, is a three-time Olympian. She finished second in New York (2:28:40) in 2010 in her marathon debut, and finished 10th at the 2012 London Olympics (2:26:07). She holds North and Central American records in the indoor 3,000- and 5,000-meter and the outdoor 10,000.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:44:11 PM
    The 10K split time for women's wheelchair leader Wakako Tsuchida of Japan was 19:43.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:44:21 PM
    Until Tatyana McFadden’s victory last year, a handful of women had dominated the women’s wheelchair racing field in Boston: Jean Driscoll of Illinois was the story of the 1990s, winning consecutively from 1990 to 1996. Her rival, four-time Boston victor Louise Sauvage of Australia, beat Driscoll in 1997, 1998, and 1999 and won eight marathons in her career. Lately, Japan’s Wakako Tsuchida has won regularly, grabbing the title five consecutive years from 2007 to 2011.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:45:04 PM
    Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa has increased his lead to 30 seconds at the 10K mark near the train depot in Framingham. His time was 16:37, which projects to a record-shattering finish time of 1:10:25. He is chasing his tenth Boston Marathon win in the men's wheelchair division. Kota Hokinoue of Japan is in second, with course record holder Josh Cassidy close behind in third.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:45:36 PM
    The elite men and Wave One of the remaining field of 35,000-plus are assembling at the starting line. Their race will begin in 15 minutes, at 10 a.m. The men's winner, who will come from this group, takes home $150,000. Wave 1 is made up of the top 9,000 runners, all of whom have qualifying times of 3:12:52 or better. The remaining three waves are also made up of 9,000 runners. Wave 2 starts at 10:25 a.m. and contains runners whose qualifying time is between 3:12:53 and 3:33:34. Wave 3 starts at 11 a.m. and contains runners with qualifying times slower than 3:33:35. Wave 4, which is made up of runners raising money for charity and others not required to qualify, will start at 11:25.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:47:38 PM
    Today's men's field is the fastest ever for Boston. Ten runners have personal bests under 2:07:00, among them defending champion Lelisa Desisa, 24, of Ethiopia. He out-sprinted Micah Kogo of Kenya and fellow countryman Gebregziabher Gebremariam in the last mile in 2013, and is trying to become the first repeat winner since Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot of Kenya won three in a row from 2006-2008. Desisa won last year despite having run a personal best of 2:04:45 only four months earlier in Dubai, an unusually quick turnaround for a marathoner. This year, he is fully rested. Desisa ran three times in Boston last year. After he won the marathon he returned for the BAA 10K in June, then set a course record of 1:00:34 in winning the BAA Half Marathon in October.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:48:08 PM
    Perhaps Lelisa Desisa's strongest challenger is Kenyan Dennis Kimetto, 30, who shattered the Chicago Marathon course record last October with a 2:03:45. It was the third best time ever on a world record-eligible course. (Boston does not have a world-record eligible course, though the two fastest marathons in history were run here. Boston's course is point-to-point and too hilly.) Kimetto also won the 2013 Toyko Marathon. In fact, he would be undefeated in marathons if he hadn't slowed up just before crossing the finish line in Berlin in 2012 and been nipped by training mate Geoffrey Mutai. His biggest challenge may come from the course itself. All of Kimetto's marathons have been run on flat, fast courses, and Boston is anything but flat.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:48:38 PM
    Also returning is Micah Kogo of Kenya, who was second last year to Lelisa Desisa in his marathon debut. Six months after his 2:10:27 in Boston he lowered his personal record by more than three minutes in finishing fourth at Chicago in 2:06:56. If he continues to improve at that rate, he'll be tough to beat. Gebregziabher Gebremariam of Ethiopia, who finished third last year, and American Jason Hartmann, who finished fourth, are also in the field again today.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:48:47 PM
    If Rita Jeptoo captures her third marathon victory today, she’ll match a feat accomplished by five women before her: Rosa Mota of Portugal captured the laurel wreath in 1987, 1988, and 1990; Uta Pippig of Germany won three consecutive years, in 1994, 1995, and 1996, followed by another three-peat by Fatuma Roba of Ethiopia in 1997, 1998, and 1999. In the unofficial era, Roberta Gibb of Massachusetts and California (1966-1968) and Sara Mae Berman of Massachusetts (1969-1971) set the stage for women to run officially.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:49:04 PM
    Of course, no woman has matched the four Boston Marathon wins by Catherine Ndereba - Catherine the Great - of Kenya. She crossed the finish line first in 2000, 2001, 2004, and 2005.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:49:59 PM
    The women are flying down the course in the early going, paced by American Shalane Flanagan, who stated her intention to lead the pack as much as possible today.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:50:35 PM
    Flanagan has hit the 5K mark in 16:10.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:51:08 PM
    Ever since Fatuma Roba of Ethiopia became the first African woman to win Boston (in 1997), women from that continent have dominated the race, winning 15 of the past 17 marathons here (Russians won in 2003 and 2007). However, Kenyans have outraced Ethiopians, capturing 10 of those 15 African wins.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:52:28 PM
    Three years ago, Desiree Davila Linden came within two seconds of becoming the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach of Michigan in 1985, barely beaten to the finish line by Caroline Kilel of Kenya. She was injured at the London Olympics, but returned to marathoning last year and came in fifth at Berlin. Linden also was runner-up at the US National Half Marathon Championships in 2013.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:54:18 PM
    Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa continues to maintain a huge lead in the men's wheelchair race as they roll through Natick. He went through 15K in 26:09. Masazumi Soejima and Kota Hokinoue, both of Japan, and Jordi Madera of Spain are bunched together in second through fourth place.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:54:57 PM
    The men's field of runners includes a strong contingent of Americans, led by Ryan Hall, Jason Hartmann, and Meb Keflezighi. Hall, a Stanford graduate, ran an American record 2:04:58 in finishing fourth in Boston in 2011. He has been dogged by injuries since then, and hasn't finished a marathon since the 2012 Olympic trials. Injury forced him to drop out of the London Olympic Marathon, as well as scheduled appearances in last year's Boston Marathon and the last two New York Marathons.

    Hartmann has always run well in Boston, finishing fourth the last two years. He has a personal best of 2:11:06. Keflezighi, who won the marathon silver medal in the 2004 Olympics, and finished fourth in London in 2012, has a personal best of 2:09:08. He is a UCLA graduate who emigrated to San Diego with his family from Eritrea in 1987. The last American to win the men's race was Greg Meyer, 31 years ago in 1983.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:55:10 PM
    At the 10K mark for the women's wheelchair racers, defending champion Tatyana McFadden had moved from 7th place (where she was at 5K) to 3rd.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:55:53 PM
    There are three Boston champions among the 21 female elite runners today. In fact, they won the past three marathons here, and they all are from Kenya: Rita Jeptoo of Kenya is the defending champ, Sharon Cherop won in 2012, and Caroline Kilel captured the crown in 2011.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:57:01 PM
    Hiroyuki Yamamoto, defending men's wheelchair champion, was well back in seventh place at the 15K mark in Natick. With him was London Marathon winner Marcel Hug, one of the today's pre-race favorites.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:58:43 PM
    The elite men and the 9,000 runners in Wave One are poised on the starting line. In a minute they will get the gun from official starter Christina Whelton. She is a member of the Brown family, sports nobility in Boston. A Brown family member has fired the gun to start the Boston Marathon every year except one since 1905.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:58:48 PM
    Three female runners were tied at the 5K mark: American Shalane Flanagan and Ethiopians Mare Dibaba and Buzunesh Deba.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 1:59:19 PM
    Even though Kenyan women have dominated the racing world - the Globe reports that their men and women won 27 of last year’s 45 top-tier races, including 10 of the 14 World Marathon Majors titles - Ethiopia will field a speedy group of women, including the fastest woman on the course today: Mare Dibaba, whose qualifying time was 2:19:52 - 5 seconds faster than defending champion Rita Jeptoo of Kenya.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 1:59:47 PM
    Ernst Van Dyk continues to lead the men's wheelchair race. He went through the 20K mark in Wellesley in 36:03.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 2:00:06 PM
    The elite men are off! Following right behind them are the 9,000 runners of both sexes who make up Wave One. The elites, including defending champion Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia and co-favorite Dennis Kimetto of Kenya, are sprinting along East Main Street in Hopkinton. They are taking advantage of the start's more than half-mile downhill, steepest on the course, to get a little clearance from the trailing horde of humanity.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 2:01:48 PM
    Shalane Flanagan, still leading the elite women, ran the first 5 miles of the marathon in 26:11.
  • Eric Bauer, Boston.com 4/21/2014 2:03:15 PM
    A huge pack of men, including most of the elites, is cruising comfortably down the long hill in the first mile.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 2:03:41 PM
    Women's wheelchair racer Wakako Tsuchida of Japan has led the entire way, a pattern that was typical of her five consecutive Boston wins from 2007 to 2011.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 2:04:13 PM
    At the 20K mark, Tatyana McFadden just grabbed the lead from Wakako Tsuchida.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 2:05:05 PM
    Tatyana McFadden was only 6 years old when a Maryland couple adopted the anemic Russian girl with spina bifida from an orphanage in St. Petersburg. Her mother got her involved in sports in an effort to get her healthy - and instead, helped develop a world-class athlete.
  • Teresa Hanafin 4/21/2014 2:05:08 PM
    And the Globe’s Shira Springer reports that McFadden has started 2014 in spectacular fashion: In March, she tried cross-country skiing at the Winter Paralympics for the first time - and won a silver medal. A week ago, she successfully defended her London Marathon title, setting a course record in the process.
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